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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 14, 2020 6:00am-8:32am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: boris johnson's cabinet will meet for the first time following yesterday's reshuffle, which was overshadowed by sajid javid's unexpected resignation as chancellor. china deploys the military as concern grows over the true scale of the coronavirus in hubei province. cases of mumps in england are at the highest level in a decade, with the steep rise being largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges. we'll be told when time's up — new rules mean you'll be notified when your tv, mobile or broadband contract is coming to an end. i'll look at how it works.
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more history for history maker fallon sherrock — she'll never forget as she just misses out on victory in her premier league darts debut against the world's best billie eilish has released the title track to a new bond film, a time to die. it's friday, the 14th of february. our top story: a new man in numberii. borisjohnson‘s reshuffled cabinet will meet for the first time this morning. sajid javid, who dramatically resigned as chancellor yesterday, he said he could not accept a demand to get rid of his advisers. our political correspondent, nick eardley, has more on the changes. boris johnson's borisjohnson‘s reshuffle had been billed as fairly modest, maybe even dull, just moving a fewjobs around and bringing some new faces into government. things don't always go
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according to plan. sajid javid's had only been in chancellor for seven months and he had been expected to stay. but behind closed doors the prime minister asked him to sack all of his aides and share his advisors with number 10. the chancellor said no, then headed home to explain why. the conditions attached required where that i replace my political advisers. these are people who have worked incredibly hard notjust on behalf of the government that the entire country and they have done a fantasticjob. i entire country and they have done a fantastic job. i was entire country and they have done a fantasticjob. i was unable to accept these conditions. i don't believe any self—respecting minister would accept those conditions. i felt the best thing to do was to go. rishi sunak gets hisjob felt the best thing to do was to go. rishi sunak gets his job and felt the best thing to do was to go. rishi sunak gets hisjob and is due to deliver the budget in less than a month. borisjohnson‘s top team will look a bit different when it meets later this morning. the prime minister has even more power now. the question is what will he do with it? nick
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eardley, bbc news, westminster. so, who is rishi sunak and why is he so in favour with boris johnson? iain watson is on downing street this morning. iain, what can you tell us about the new chancellor? why has he been chosen? well, there will be one familiar face at downing street this morning, i have to say thatis street this morning, i have to say that is larry the card. he is waiting to return after his early morning stroll —— larry the cat. rishi sunak the new chancellor is a former investment banker. i think the reason he has thejob is — two reasons, he is very loyal to boris johnson, defend the government well on the media, can we he was sajid javid's number two of the treasury so javid's number two of the treasury so he has some knowledge of the budget. downing street weren't entirely expecting him to walk, so
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rishi sunak is best placed to replace him. and he will be in number11, replace him. and he will be in number 11, excepting the condition sajid javid refused. sajid javid would not have a joint advisory team with number 10, which he assumed would be controlled by number 10, not sajid javid 11, but rishi sunak has signed up to that. so we are seeing more influence at the heart of government by borisjohnson and his powerful advisors was not given thatis his powerful advisors was not given that is the case i think it would be likely they will focus on what the prime minister calls his people's priorities. unencumbered by the treasury, he will be able to spend more money on levelling up, as he calls it, trying to narrow the gap between north and south, and also trying to present his government is a very new government, trying to present his government is a very new government, a trying to present his government is a very new government, a departure from previous conservative governments, too. thank you very much. we'll be speaking to
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robertjenrick, the housing, communities and local government secretary after 7am. the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in china has continued to rise but there are doubts over the true scale of the epidemic. in the last few hours, officials said a further 121 people died yesterday. it signalled a marked decline on wednesday's dramatic increase but the world health organization is concerned over the way cases are being counted. let's get more now from our china correspondent stephen mcdonell, who's in beijing. it's good to see you. when we were talking the other day about how doctors are now saying if you just have symptoms, you are almost counted as a case. the problem is now to recognise how dramatically or if at all, the number of cases because the diagnosis criteria have changed. yeah, the trend mapping is kind of in a mess now because the official figures, kind of in a mess now because the officialfigures, while nobody thought they caught everyone, at least where sort of showing a pattern in terms of how the emergency is unfolding. then
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they have changed the way people are to be determined to be definitely infected. it kind of has thrown everything into chaos, a little bit. but what we can see, though, is — it's a very different picture inside her baby province and the rest of china. in hubei province dass mark —— hubei province, another 5000 people have moved into that definitely infected column. that could be due to the accounting procedure. so if you have the symptoms of the coronavirus by a ct scan showing an infected jazz, then you are considered to be definitely infected, which the doctors can kind of tell that you are. so that is kind of a reason for today's rise if you look at the numbers, though, the increase... i mean, yesterday's increase, 85% of those numbers that have come in the infected column have come in the infected column have come in the infected column have come from within hubei
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province. if you look at the doubts, it is 95% -- province. if you look at the doubts, it is 95% —— if you look at the deaths. so outside of hubei, it is starting to slow. these measures of stopping people's movement even as they returned to work, do seem to be kicking in. thank you. stephen mcdonell there for us. politicians in the united states have voted to support a law that would limit president trump's ability to attack iran without their permission. eight republican senators have sided with democrats despite the president's prior warning not to support it. he is expected to veto the resolution once it's sent to white house. the high court is due to rule on a case brought by a former police officer who sent tweets that were seen as offensive to members of the transgender community. harry miller was interviewed by police and it was a logged as a ‘non hate—crime incident‘, which could show up on checks carried out by future employers. he argues that goes against the right to free speech.
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our legal correspondent clive coleman has the details. harry miller regularly tweets, sometimes using graphic language about proposed changes to the law that could make it easier for a about proposed changes to the law that could make it easierfor a man to be recognised as a woman and vice—versa. in january last year, to be recognised as a woman and vice—versa. injanuary last year, a change gender woman complained about his tweets. he was questioned by humberside police and a non— prime hate incident was recorded on a report —— non— crime. now evidence is necessary. in actualfact, the victim can be anyone who is offended by what you tweet. the idea that you can record something of such a serious nature, irrespective of evidence, isjust serious nature, irrespective of evidence, is just crazy! serious nature, irrespective of evidence, isjust crazy! every year, more than 25,000 nine prime hate incidents are recorded by uk police in order to stop them escalating into hate crimes. but
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this case raises the question of what should happen when common issues like gender identity does make comments on gender identity are provocative. should they be reported and logged against the person against them? yes, there's this campaign. it goes back to this whole i'm only exercising my free speech is a joke, i have a right to say this stuff. a lot of the arguments the anti— trans— campaigners have been using have been very simplistic and largely wrong. so they aren't based in any science, they are targeting a group of people deliberately to try to direct abusive speeds toward them simply because they are that group. it's a step too far. if harry miller succeeds, police guidance on non— crime hate incidents good have to be changed and tens of thousands of records destroyed. —— could have
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to be changed. clive coleman, bbc news. 17 jamaican men who were deported from the uk on tuesday have been released from an army processing centre in the capital kingston. they had all been convicted of criminal offences and given prison sentences of 12 months or more. greg mckenzie has more. for 24—year—old chevron brown, the last 12 months have been what he describes as a living hell. deported from britain for a string of driving offences, he came to the uk at the age of 1a and settled in oxford before being deported back to jamaica. i'll tell you, i'm not jamaican, i'm only jamaican jamaica. i'll tell you, i'm not jamaican, i'm onlyjamaican by blood because i was born there. they are tearing families apart, they are ripping fathers away from their children, they are making our pa rents stressed. children, they are making our parents stressed. they're making the kids stressed, it will lead to further problems down the road. on tuesday, the home office resumed rotation flights back to jamaica, saying its priority was keeping british people safe.
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these pictures show the 17 men being released from an army processing centre in the country's capital, kingston. an army processing centre in the country's capital, kingstonlj an army processing centre in the country's capital, kingston. iwas seeing some country's capital, kingston. iwas seeing some very country's capital, kingston. iwas seeing some very distraught family members, i saw a mixed reception for them. but importantly, i saw a grown men crying. i don't take no pleasure in saying that even one man came out from the families i was talking to and had a child since, now that child has just and had a child since, now that child hasjust had daddy ripped and had a child since, now that child has just had daddy ripped away from him entirely. and the question is why. 0n from him entirely. and the question is why. on that flight was 33—year—old rupert smith, a first—time offender. he left behind a wife and three children. there is a wife and three children. there is a lot of emotions to put into words, but i can't find a word suitable enough to put it altogether. a sense, the whole feeling is empty. while the home office as it doesn't comment on individual cases, it has defended the deportations, making no apology whatsoever or seeking to remove what it's as identical as
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foreign criminals from the uk. greg mckenzie, bbc news, kingston, jamaica. a record temperature of over 20 degrees celsius has been recorded in antarctica. scientists at the world meteorological organization described the new record as "incredible and abnormal." they've previously warned that melting ice on the continent could cause a devastating global sea level rise of more than three metres. it was only last week we were saying 18.3 degrees was the record. and it has been set again. it is 6:12am. you might have woken up to a nice bunch of flowers this morning, but the residents of a street in bristol have received an even better valentine's day bouquet — from the graffiti artist banksy. this was put on the side of a house. a stencilled image on the side of a house shows a young girl appearing to fire a catapult. further up the wall is a red splatter made from plastic flowers.
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you couldn't quite see what it was at first. the image has also been posted on banksy‘s instagram page — which suggests it is authentic. crowds will be gathering to have a look. they will be, they will be. it's 6:13am. darts now. the history maker's been back in action and it was very nearly a brilliant win. it went brilliantly, but she didn't win, it sounds nonsensical, but the fa ct win, it sounds nonsensical, but the fact she came into this as a challenger, she had that great success at the premier league, playing against the world's bass. no challenger has ever won the premier league of darts —— world's best. a challenger is invited to play in each of the events. so she
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drew, but because no challenger has ever won, that was quite good. she drew against glenn duran. angie is picking up a legion of fans as she goes. —— and she is. competing as the first woman to play in the premier league of darts, she was named as a challenger to face glen durrant in nottingham and came very close to causing another upset. she was leading at one stage. we will have more in this throughout the morning. contrasting fortunes for liverpool, the men close in on the premier league title, the women are hoping to stave off relegation. this brilliant goal from rachel furness not enough as they lost to arsenal last night. rocket ronnie is back on form at the welsh 0pen. he won both of his matches to reach the quarterfinals. and back at world number one — we'll be finding out how rory mcilroy got on in his first tournament since returning to the top. he is playing in florida at the moment and made a good start, rory
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mcilroy, as you would expect from his consistent performances as of late. will you stay with us for the papers? we were talking about the temperature in antarctica, 20 degrees, that is borrowing isn't it? it just exposes more degrees, that is borrowing isn't it? itjust exposes more surface and that brings problems. fine at the moment but all eyes on what is going to happen over the next 2a — 26 hours with storm dennis coming in. the concern the amount of rain. amber weather warnings for some parts of the country, some parts of the pennines and parts of devon and cornwall, and adding to the mix
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on sunday, parts of the south downs, as much as a millimetres at seven increasing risk of some flooding. storm dennis will become one of the deepest atlantic storms in modern day records. at that at the moment, not a bad start to the day, a bit frosty in parts of scotland and eastern england. temperature is already rising in the west. northern ireland, western parts of scotland, the breeze digs up and outbreaks of rain. the rain spreads into northern england and wales through the afternoon and also south—west england. some heavy births at time. the south—east should stay dry. 11— 12 degrees the highest temperatures. rain on and off throughout the night. puddles for
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tomorrow morning. north of the midlands, clear skies and a chilli night with frost possible. incredibly mild start in the north—east corner. 0utbreaks possible. incredibly mild start in the north—east corner. outbreaks of rain coming and going. some eastern areas will not see a lot. but in the west, north—west england, western wales, the rain will be persisted through much of the day. while it would be a mild day, it will be increasingly windy with widespread chaos and went possibly touching 70 miles an hour by the end of saturday. into sunday, the weather fronts over the same sort of areas with rain totals continuing. a thoroughly wet start to sunday morning across england and wales, assisting in southern counties. further north, sunday will turn brighter with sunshine and heavy
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showers, some snows on the hills. scotla nd showers, some snows on the hills. scotland and northern ireland, will see the strongest winds into monday morning and potentially disruptive gust of wind, up to 175 miles an hour may more. can you go back to the bus? here we go. if you were standing where you are now and that happened, it could ruin the day. standing where you are now and that happened, it could ruin the daym could do. i avoid them now. some people find it amusing, not me. if you do it deliberately. that
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is just a mean. let's take a look at today's front pages, which are dominated by sajid javid's departure from 11 downing street. the telegraph says that borisjohnson has "brought the treasury to heel". the daily mail takes a less positive view of the matter. it's headline is "sajid fury over pm knifing". the paper also reports that the duke and duchess of sussex have axed thejobs of all 15 of their uk staff. and the metro claims that sajid javid was "thrown under the bus" by borisjohnson. that's a nod to the fact that mrjavid's father worked as a bus driver. and if you were on social media overnight you would have seen a lot of chat about the theme tune to the new james bond film, sung by billie eilish, which was released at midnight. bbc sounds has a special programme about it, and we'll be playing the song for you later in the show. we will also get a fan's verdict. we will also get a fan's verdictlj was a lot of
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kerfuffle about the james bond themes. quite a kerfuffle at number" and james bond themes. quite a kerfuffle at number 11 and speculation about what the new chancellor will deliver. the budget set for march 11 and a lot of speculation about whether that will happen and if it does what will be in it. it will be... well, sajid javid does what will be in it. it will be... well, sajidjavid never delivered a budget but it would be rishi sunak's first budget. an whether it will have cuts to level up whether it will have cuts to level up the economy. a lovely story this morning on line. suggesting the pound land has sold 14,000 engagement rings... how much were they because not everything is a poundin
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they because not everything is a pound in pound land? they were a pound. they are intended to be used as placeholders for proper rings. —— 40,000. don't be ridiculous, so you haveit 40,000. don't be ridiculous, so you have it until they can afford... 0ther have it until they can afford... other it might've been case the woman said, no. spending on valentine's day reaching £853 million, up 8% on the year before. do you know what we're talking about later? pet valentine. why are you so excited by that, people who give pets valentine. perhaps draw the line at your pets. a smiley. his franchise in the us becoming a
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reality, playing the first match tomorrow, friendly. how big is that? six years in the making. interestingly, they will be facing la galaxy in their first proper league match. is it a league that is littered... significant now that players from the mls have made a move to the premier league so it is a launching pad for some new place to come through. this is where george best used to play. following in famous footsteps. i imagine seeing pictures in cleveland with david beckham. he was on the sideline. the chairman of
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the club was upset because they needed more funding and did not get down quick enough to chat to him. talk us through the outfit. two everton players on that winter break. they have been out in new york, new york fashion week and this is what they have been rocking out. one looks like a dressing gown. a gucci dressing round, with £2700, the gucci jacket. it is the purple pointy shoes. would you wear that! you see what i wear when i come in in the morning. i would put you as a cravat and smoking
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jacket... in the morning. i would put you as a cravat and smoking jacket. .. me! in the morning. i would put you as a cravat and smoking jacket... me! i am still looking at those issues. gentlemen, thank you very much. cases of mumps in england are at their highest level in a decade, according to figures seen by bbc breakfast. public health england says the increase has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges amongst young adults who missed out on the mmr vaccine when they were children. tim muffett reports. she would be screaming from being in pain... lectures, essays, the odd party and mumps, the second year at leeds university has not gone quite to plan. i went to bed normal, everything fine and then i woke up and, bank, my face was puffed out and, bank, my face was puffed out and swollen. were you surprised at how painful it was?
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i got prescribed morphine. itjust started out as pain in my ear and jaw and then it started swelling, so painful. your job pretty much locks and i could open my mouth this much. brushing my teeth, it started swelling up and i had a pretty fat face. other student who have had mumps have been sharing before and after photographs. in england it is at its highest levels ina england it is at its highest levels in a decade and many universities and colleges have seen our brains. more than 5000 laboratory confirmed cases of mumps lustre, five times the number seen in 2018. —— last year. that was when the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was incorrectly linked to autism
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creating a panic among parents. the link has been proved to be false but many children missed out on their mmrjabs. they are now university, sharing their bugs, and that has meant we are seeing this huge increase in cases. around half of mumps cases were amongst unvaccinated people according to public—health people but many, like these three, did have the mmr jab and the following booster and yet they still got mumps. the mumps element of the vaccine is not as effective the measles and rubella. the more people vaccinated, the harder it is for the bug to get around and be shed. you can still potentially get mumps because a lot of people did not get vaccinated? exactly. those who have had a mmr jab are less
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likely to suffer serious complications, you can erect cases have serious effects. ——in a rare cases. but it is never too late to catch up with a booster. tim muffett, bbc news. i had ihad mumps i had mumps when i was very young and when you see the impact of what it does, the swelling and pain, it is very interesting. it would be interesting if you got in touch if you struggled with it, if you struggled choosing the vaccine. and also, there are generations making decisions for their children. we will be talking to two doctors after eight o'clock and we will go through all the risks and talk about some of the damage because it can be a
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very serious condition. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. black and asian lgbt people have experienced racism through online dating apps or in person. the research by the charity stonewall found many from minority backgrounds said they suffered from isolation, loneliness and poor mental health, as a result of racism from within the lgbt community. sometimes i would go on apps and it would say, no black people, no asians. i have been rejected in the past because of my race. what can you do? just keep it moving. as a batman you have to
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be hyper— masculine or you are entertainment. the number of people in the capital keeping exotic pets is on the rise. it's not illegal to keep animals like monkeys and crocodiles as long as people have the correct licenes. new figures given to bbc london show that over the last two years the rspca has rescued around 800 in london, many of which had been abused or abandoned. they are more popular than they were historically and estimates are that around 700,000 reptiles, including snakes, lizards, daughters kept in households but that might be an under estimate. you can see more on that story on inside out london on monday here on bbc one at 7.30. let's take a look at the travel situation now... services the travel situation now... suspended because of a truck services suspended because of a truck repair.
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traffic building in barking. in the west end, regent street remains close. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning, today is a fairly quiet day of weather, the come before the storm which is set to hit us on the weekend. dry during daylight hours. loud thickening as we head through the days are quite great by the time we get to the end of it. lots of morning brightness. a touch of frost. the wind will start touch of frost. the wind will start to strengthen as we head through the afternoon. top temperature is a mild 10- 12 afternoon. top temperature is a mild 10— 12 degrees. it is then due to turn wet this evening and overnight. this band of rain store over us so outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and the wind quite brisk. a mild night to come with overnight lows of 9—10. wet and
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windy over the weekend. this is storm dennis. this is an amber in the morning for rain creeping into parts of surrey as we head through the day on sunday so possibly some disruption and may be localised flooding. very wet and windy but, by sunday evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half—an—hour. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning — cases of mumps in england are the highest they've been in ten years. we'll be finding out why students are at the most risk. ifi if i was to give anybody a
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valentine's des card, it would be to my dog, bacon. it may be valentine's day, but it's all about puppy love for some. so, will you be buying your pooch a present today? billie eilish sings ‘a time to die' and, the wait is over! that's billie eilish with the 25th james bond theme tune. we'll hear some more and find out what fans make of it. all that coming up a little later. a summary of today's menus. —— main news. more on the coronavirus outbreak now and let's get the latest from two virus hotspots. stefan fehrenbacher is onboard a quarantined cruise ship docked off the coast of japan, where there's been almost 220 cases, but first chris hill, who is one of the few remaining brits in wuhan — the epicentre of the outbreak. chris, can you paint a picture of
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the circumstances you're in at the moment? right now the place i am living in, the residential area is under quarantine itself, which means that people within the community area have two designate one person to go for shopping every three days and they have to register with medical professionals at the main gate. so, chris, what happens if people try to leave the area you are in when they are not entitled to? 0h, in when they are not entitled to? oh, if they tried to leave when they are not registered to, the police will be informed and they will be arrested under braking quarantine. and they will be arrested for about ten or 12 days. and they will be arrested for about ten or12 days. how and they will be arrested for about ten or 12 days. how you seen that happen? i have not seen anything from my community, but a friend of mine had showed me a video from their community of somebody trying
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to break quarantine and they were — er, taken into custody. you are using your language carefully, what do you mean? they were trying to leave their housing area where they lived and the medical professionals and the security for the community tried to stop them. they were still not having any of it so the police we re not having any of it so the police were called mark as well and they still tried to fight it. they were apprehended and tackled, handcuffed and taken apprehended and tackled, handcuffed and ta ken away. apprehended and tackled, handcuffed and taken away. ok. tell me chris, about your own circumstances and family arrangements there. well, my wife still works. my wife is still working because as you know she is a nurse ina working because as you know she is a nurse in a children's' hospital. my daughter is a rambunctious little four—year—old, sitting watching tv. but she doesn't go out. she knows it's not safe to go outside,
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she knows people are ill. and i spend my day attending to her and reading. looking forward now, what are the authorities telling you about what will happen next for you? er, which authorities? the chinese authorities or...? the home office? authorities? the chinese authorities or...? the home 0ffice?|j authorities? the chinese authorities or...? the home office? i meant the chinese authorities in terms of your immediate circumstances and the quarantine arrangements. oh, the quarantine arrangements. oh, the quarantine arrangements. oh, the quarantine arrangements for the housing area, they are not too sure how long it will last because they have to make sure that everybody is infection free and not a risk to anybody else. so the people at the gate, when i asked them how long it would last, they said in the best way possible, how long is a piece of string? so, just go back a step, chris, these are difficult circumstances you are in. you were
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offered a seat to fly out of china but you chose not to, you chose to stay with your family. will you try and leave with your family if that possibility arises? no, because my way is determined to stay and help look after the children and that is her work. i still would look after the children and that is her work. istill would not look after the children and that is her work. i still would not break up my family. and a lot of people would very much respect you for that, chris. just tell us the work your wife is doing, what has she told you about? i cannot imagine it is easy working in these hospitals. what is it like in the conditions there and what is she dealing with? she is working in an icu with young infa nts. working in an icu with young infants. but any incident with infection is moved to another part of the hospital. they are moved to the other part of the hospital within ten minutes of
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that information being found out. so all the patients, all young patients, are separated from each other, those who have serious infection are moved to the quarantine area on the hospital grounds. chris, we wish you well. i think maybe we can hear your daughter in the background making a little bit of noise. it cannot be easyin little bit of noise. it cannot be easy in those circumstances. thank you for your time. we wish you luck. thank you. spencer is on the ship in yokohama. tell us about your situation? thank you for having me on. as far as my situation is concerned, thankfully i found out about a week ago that i tested negative for the coronavirus.
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i'm travelling with three friends and all four of us were part of that initial group of 273 passengers that we re initial group of 273 passengers that were tested for the virus. and we did have to wait three days, but we eventually found out that everyone who had been part of that initial group, who had tested positive, had been taken off the ship. thankfully the four of us are — at least one point we were negative and for now we are trying to remain optimistic and hold out. why was it necessary for you to be tested for the virus? well, if i had to speculate, i had a feverfor well, if i had to speculate, i had a fever for about 24 hours, one week into the cruise. so that was about a week before we got back in yokohama. 0nce week before we got back in yokohama. once i had that fever the medical staff found out about it and the night we docked in yokohama, i made the decision to go down to the medical centre to make
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sure they knew that i had at one point a fever and a sore throat. i believe having those records, the japanese quarantine crew determined myself, my cabin mate and the other two people who i am travelling with, who happened to be in the cabinjust next to us, were all deemed high risk for being positive. but tha nkfully risk for being positive. but thankfully we were not. tell me about the mood on the ship at the moment, on the liner. you start off with it being a holiday and you are treated really well and looks after. but literal cabin fever must start you setting out points? there have been some days that have been easier than others. i would say that. tha nkfully than others. i would say that. thankfully my cabin mate and i and the other two people decided to spend a little bit extra and get a balcony. which at the time we weren't sure if it was going to be worth the money. but it has made a world of difference. we are able to
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open the door. for the first week we we re open the door. for the first week we were actually facing south and we we re were actually facing south and we were able to get some sign of a —— some sign of the day. that made it some sign of the day. that made it so much easier to be optimistic and have a good attitude —— sunshine all day, but most people have rooms with no windows at all or a small porthole without access to fresh air. soi porthole without access to fresh air. so i consider myself very fortu nate air. so i consider myself very fortunate considering the circumstances. and yesterday we understood that perhaps those who had tested negative for the coronavirus and were over the age of 80 would be let off the ship. do you know anything about that? we actually just got a little know anything about that? we actuallyjust got a little bit of an update about two minutes before i came on, and they announced there had been 11 people who japanese
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health authorities had deemed all abide under the criteria, and those 11 people will be disembarking later this afternoon —— had deemed they will have qualified. are any of those people british? i'm not sure. i understand you are studying at university in china. where will you go after this trip? me and my friends all had tickets to return to china, but i will be going back to vancouver. i have everything packed up vancouver. i have everything packed up with me to spend the next six months in china, however, once this all changed, and once the outbreak became became more ——
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continued spreading, really receive messages from our university that not only was the semester postpone, but we we re was the semester postpone, but we were simply not allowed back. i got a message an hour ago re— emphasising the fact that you are not allowed to return to china and still we, the university, tell you that you are allowed to return to china. well, that is very interesting. you are going through upheaval but you seem in positive spirits, i should say, at the very least. thank you for keeping us up—to—date. i wish you well, spencer. in quarantine on that diamond princess liner off the coast of yokohama. you get the sense of two very different quarantine situations but very interesting. that announcement that the first 11 people may be that of the ship. we are
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getting a bit pointed. fallon sherrock continues to take the darts world by storm — collecting a new legion of fans in the process. the sherrock of nottingham as she was labelled last night — bit of a clue where she was playing — was leadng and when she went to 6—4, meant that she would at least draw against glen durant who came back to level the match in the end. no challenger has ever won a game in the premier league, shows the size of her achievement, and she keeps racking them up. she is stepping up a serious degree. before we were saying look at this woman is taking the darts world by storm, but now she is producing performances that mean she won't be just the plucky underdog, she is a genuine challenger. taking the darts world by storm and gathering fans in the process. the sherrock of nottingham, a bit of a clue of where she was playing
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out, went 6—4. dust playing at. and she said aferwards "what an atmosphere, what a night." with these results that looks like gender will become irrelevant as she produces these performances time and time again. in the women's super league, arsenal narrowed the gap on the top two in the womens super league by beating liverpool 3—2. the game was moved to chester after ongoing problems with their normal home ground at prenton park. liverpool levelled the game going into half time with a stunning goal from rachel furness but arsenal went on to claim the win thanks to vivianne miedema. the result mean that arsenal stay third in the league but are nowjust three points off manchester city who are top. ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the welsh 0pen quarterfinals. the four—time champion took less than an hour to beat soheil vahedi and plays
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mark selby in the last eight later today. rory mcilroy proving why he's back up to world number one. in his first event since topping the rankings, he's four shots off the lead at the genesis open in california. trailing the leader america's matt kuchar. it bodes well heading towrds the masters the one and only major he's yet to win. and how do you put the narrowest of defeats behind you as england's cricketers return to t20 action. they face south africa again later and here's bowler chris jordan explaining just how you come back having lost last time byjust one run. it is the nature of t—28 cricket. it is high risk and everyone is on edge. it isjust important is high risk and everyone is on edge. it is just important to stay nice and level mentally, have an honest assessment of your performers and then try and give that 10%, 20% more next game. very measured delivery. it could be
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leading the team talk. perhaps when by one run this time. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. those storm scenes, we have to get used to those again across the weekend? yes, indeed. stomp dennis, rough seas, potentially damaging went, perhaps not as strong as storm ciara. but the met office has put out amber warnings for rain. up to 150 millimetres of rain in some of these spots and given the fact the ground is already saturated it may lead to flooding. this is responsible, storm dennis.
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it will be one of the deepest north atlantic storms in modern records. this morning, mostly dry, a bright start but on the cool side. some of frost around with temperatures only above freezing. wet and windy in the second half of the rush hour. during the afternoon, and south—west england heavy burst. sunshine and showers towards scotland. east anglia will stay drive—through daylight hours. some of these errors will see some of the wettest falls. midlands northwards, clear skies and a chilly night like anotherjust
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gone. a touch of frost to take into saturday morning. right across the east on saturday morning. it will not last. lots of rain around on saturday. some dry moments in ever is. in england and wales, especially on the hills, the rain will be relentless. an incredibly mild day, 13-14 relentless. an incredibly mild day, 13—14 highs. when strengthening and picking up through saturday afternoon and evening. they will continue through saturday night. weather front rippling around england and wales, the rainfall totals will continue to tot up as well. potential for flooding into sunday. some sunshine in the north. a few showers around. a mild day in the south. scotland and northern
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ireland on sunday night and into monday morning will see the strongest of the winds, may topping 75, potentially 80 miles per hour, winds. they will cause travel disruption and potentially some damage as well. we have had storm ciara, dennis now, helen next week. next week and does not look too great either. you're going to talk to us about mobile phone contracts. either you are on top of it or maybe you do not know it all and you need to know. are on top of it or maybe you do not know it all and you need to knowlj think there are more of us who do not know. you may have signed up on a cheap deal but then the price goes up. pretty
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annoying. the regulator of, found 20 million households have come to the end of the phone, broadband or pay—tv contract but have not done anything about it. from tomorrow, phones will have to wa nt from tomorrow, phones will have to want customers 10—14 days before the contract comes to finish. from tomorrow, firms will have to warn customers ten to 40 days before their contract comes to an end. i realise le sommer i was paying over the odds and i looked into things slowly. —— last summer. these things slowly. —— last summer. these things tend to take a while. looking on line, i stood to save a substantial amount. with
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my new provider, it went from £86 to much cheaper. i was surprised and annoyed idid not cheaper. i was surprised and annoyed i did not look sooner. you heard from mark, surprise, shock, angry that people are being overcharged when it comes to the end of their contract. i suppose this is what your rules are intended to address. absolutely. there are millions of customers like mark who are out of contract and pay more than they should. that is why we are requiring all companies to tell you when your contract is coming to an end, to let you know if the price is going to increase. and really importantly to give your tailored information about the best deal they can offer you if you sign up to a new contract with them. we think this will give really powerful information to customers so they can shop around and get the
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best deal. why has it taken so long, it seems a relatively simple change. iam sure it seems a relatively simple change. i am sure you will tell me a lot of work went in behind the change. but they have been cashing in on our apathy for so long. some have issued warnings that the contract is coming to an. but some have not. pay—tv companies now have to tell you when the contract is coming to an end and give you clear information is about the options available to you. this is part of a much broader programme of work we have had running on fairness. we have introduced automatic compensation, super switching and this is just the next step. the old age that you customers get a better deal than old customers. we setting banking, energy and broadband. there
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is a danger that if you clamp down on those firms who exploit for want of a better word loyal customers, the cheaper deals will disappear? we wa nt to cheaper deals will disappear? we want to make sure that everyone gets afairdeal want to make sure that everyone gets a fair dealfor their want to make sure that everyone gets a fair deal for their communications and we certainly do not want to see the death of a discount. who does not love a discount. the point of the reforms we are introducing is to put the power back in the hands of the customer. we know that mobile broadband is very competitive. we think they will be able to shop around and get a much better deal. the same argument about who is responsible? if you are not engaged or interested, on top of your contract, it is your fault for not shopping around.
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it is pretty frustrating when people see new customers getting a better bargain. we have looked this in detail in the broadband and mobile market and it is more complex. we find long—standing customers can get a really good deal even if they stay with their existing provider, providing they sign to a new contract and that is why these reforms today are so important. we do people tell us they do not know when their contract is up and now they will and the good news is that a number of the larger providers have said they are going to match the new customer price for existing customers when they sign up to a new deal so that is really good news. the consumer director at 0fcom, thank you. is coming in tomorrow. you should get a notification and if you want to save a bit of money it might be worth looking around
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to a different deal. do you love your pets? yes, in a conventional sense, absolutely. i was not asking in any other sense but make laughter. it is of the 14th of february today. icy, it is valentine's day. would you give your pet a valentine ‘s cloud? it is something i not do but maybe some people board. absolutely not, i would give one to my wife.|j some people board. absolutely not, i would give one to my wife. i do not give anybody a valentines but
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if i did it would be for my dog. personally, i would not but only because my mum would. iam nota i am not a particularfan of valentine's day. when i receive this, i misunderstood what it was about. anyway... is that a cloud specifically for your pet? happy valentine. a couple of thoughts. erica has been in touch and she says it to be fair, the did not get a cloud but got a new pot of dream is. 0k... let's
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cloud but got a new pot of dream is. 0k. .. let's leave cloud but got a new pot of dream is. 0k... let's leave that one.” cloud but got a new pot of dream is. ok... let's leave that one. i like steve's comment, my cat is a thing of evil. as they all are but we still love them. maybe just sent a picture of your cat. in the conventional way. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. black and asian lgbt people have been telling the bbc about their experiences of racism withing the lgbt community. research by the charity stonewall shows 61% say had experienced racism while using online dating apps or in person. the charity found many from minority backgrounds said they suffered from isolation, loneliness and poor mental health, as a result. sometimes i would go on apps and it would say, like, no black people, no asians. i have been rejected
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in the past because of my race. what can you do? just keep it moving. as a black man you have to be hyper— masculine or you are entertainment. the number of people in the capital keeping exotic pets is on the rise. it's not illegal to keep animals like monkeys and crocodiles as long as people have the correct licenes. as long as people have the correct licence. new figures show that over the last two years the rspca has rescued around 800 in london, many of which had been abused or abandoned. they are more popular than they were historically and estimates are that around 700,000 reptiles, including snakes, lizards, kept in households but that might be an under estimate. you can see more on that story on inside out london on monday here on bbc one at 7:30. let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0verground services between south tottenham and barking remain suspended as track repairs continue.
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0n the trains: south western services are suspended between shepperton and teddington following a broken down train. 0n the roads — traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking in wapping, the highway is slow through the roadworks towards tower hill, with tailbacks to the limehouse link. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning, today is a fairly quiet day of weather, the calm before the storm which is set to hit us at the weekend. dry during daylight hours. cloud thickening as we head through the days are quite grey by the time we get to the end of it. lots of morning brightness. a touch of frost. the wind will start to strengthen as we head through the afternoon. top temperature a mild 10— 12 degrees. it is then due to
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turn wet this evening and overnight. this band of rain stalls over us so outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and the wind quite brisk. a mild night to come with overnight lows of 9—10. wet and windy over the weekend. this is storm dennis. this is an amber warning in the morning for rain creeping into parts of surrey as we head through the day on sunday so possibly some disruption and may be localised flooding. very wet and windy but, by sunday evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: cases of mumps in england are at the highest level
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in a decade, with the steep rise being largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges. boris johnson's cabinet will meet for the first time following yesterday's reshuffle, which was overshadowed by sajid javid's unexpected resignation as chancellor. told when time's up. new rules mean you'll be notified when your tv, mobile or broadband contract is coming to an end. i'll look at how it works. history maker fallon sherrock caled it "a night she'll never forget" as she just misses out on victory in her premier league of darts debut against the world's best. still clearing up from storm ciara and storm dennis on the way. we will be speaking with volunteers trying to keep this area safe. and i'll have the latest on storm dennis and its impacts right here
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on breakfast. it's out — the new bond theme, for the new film a time to die is released by 18—year—old billie eilish. it's friday the 14th of february. our top story: cases of mumps in england are at their highest level in a decade. public health england recorded more than 5,000 confirmed cases last year, five times the number in 2018. the increase has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges amongst young adults. the cohort of young people who weren't vaccinated, getting to know each other, sharing their bugs and that means there has been this huge increase in cases. 0ne one in ten people will suffer serious complications from the illness. flora cox told us about how she got mumps in his second year at university. it started out with just pain in my ear and jaw and then it started swelling — so
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painful. your jaw pretty much locked and i couldn't open my mouth, only this much. —— pretty much locks. borisjohnson reshuffles the cabinet and puts a new man in number 11 — rishi sunak takes over as chancellor after sajid javid dramatically resigned yesterday. mrjavid said he could not accept a demand to get rid of his advisers. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley, has more on the changes. borisjohnson's reshuffle had been billed as fairly modest, maybe even dull, moving a fewjobs around, bringing some new faces into government. reporter: hello, chancellor. but things don't always go according to plan. sajid javid had only been in chancellor for seven months and he had been expected to stay. but behind closed doors, the prime minister asked him to sack all his aides and share his advisors with number 10. the chancellor said no, resigned, then headed home to explain why.
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the conditions that were attached was a requirement that all my political advisers. you know, these are people that have worked incredibly hard, on behalf of notjust the government, but the whole country. they've done a fantasticjob. i was unable to accept these conditions. i don't believe any self—respecting minister would accept such conditions. and so therefore i felt the best thing to do was to go. reporter: good afternoon, chancellor. rishi sunak gets hisjob and is due to deliver the budget in less than a month. borisjohnson's top team will look a bit different when it meets later this morning. the pm has even more power now. the question is — what will he do with it? nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. so, who is rishi sunak and why is he so in favour with boris johnson? iain watson is on downing street this morning. iain, what can you tell us about the new chancellor? 0ut out with the old and in with the new. 0ur out with the old and in with the new. our new is he? very new. 39 yea rs new. our new is he? very new. 39 years old, a former investment banker, rishi sunak. he has never
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had a top ranking cabinetjob and there are several reasons to think why he has been appointed, not at least that sajid javid worked out, refusing to accept the sacking of his advisers. he is seen as a safe pairof his advisers. he is seen as a safe pair of hands his advisers. he is seen as a safe pairof hands on his advisers. he is seen as a safe pair of hands on the media and had a good election campaign. second, if you're going to get rid of your chancellor, the best way to bring in the budget next month is bringing the budget next month is bringing the person who is number two at number11. the person who is number two at number 11. rishi sunak has stepped up number 11. rishi sunak has stepped up from deputy to the next level. it shouldn't be a spanner in the works. the other reason he is willing to be installed by borisjohnson is loyalty to boris johnson. installed by borisjohnson is loyalty to borisjohnson. there is going to be a new team of advisers working across number 10 and number 11 downing st for the first time. some historic
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differences between the chancellor and prime minister, hopefully cast aside. but there is one further reason why he is there and wait sajid javid has gone — the prime minister says he is determined to deliver for those who lent them their votes at the general election, and ifa their votes at the general election, and if a chancellor is going to constrain public spending when the prime minister wants to spend more, then that would have led to some difficulties. it is highly likely rishi sunak will be onboard for what borisjohnson is trying to achieve and will perhaps give him a bit more ofa and will perhaps give him a bit more of a free hand to try and spend on political priorities without worrying too much in the short term about the bottom line. indeed. iain, thank you very much indeed. iain what's in there for us. —— iain watson there for us. the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in china has continued
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to rise but there are doubts about the true scale of the epidemic. in the last few hours, officials said a further 121 people died yesterday. it signalled a marked decline on wednesday's dramatic increase but the world health organization is concerned over the way cases are being counted. let's get more now from our china correspondent stephen mcdonell, who's in beijing. stephen, good morning to you. bring us up—to—date on what is coming out from the chinese authorities this morning. it's funny how you look at numbers. 5000 new cases in hubei province because it is better than 10,000 yesterday. i mean, 5000 new cases is still a lot but it seems to be the result of this lager from the day before when they changed the way in which they measured those who should be in the definitely infected column. so now you don't have two wait for a loud test to be definitely infected. —— to wait. if doctors said you have the disease because you are showing symptoms plus a ct scan showing a chest infection, you are in that column
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stopped again, that is possibly part of the reason for these big jump of thousands of people in hubei province. but there is a big difference between inside hubei province and the rest of china. if those numbers, let's assume in trend terms they are instructive of the real shape of where this emergency is going, it is a much better picture outside hubei. the numbers, the increase today, 80% of those new infections are inside hubei province. in terms of the day of —— in terms of the deaths, 95% of them are inside hubei province. these strict rules emplaced on people's movements do seem to be working. but in hubei, still a desperately dangerous situation i would suggest. stephen, thank you very much.
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japan has now had it's first coronavirus death. meanwhile, some passengers cleared of the virus have started to leave a cruise ship hit by the virus. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is there for us. rupert, what can you tell us? it morning. when we spoke yesterday we heard from the japanese government they were potentially going to allow some people off the ship. what within the last hour or so is the first busload passengers leaving the ship. they had curtains on the windows so we couldn't see how many people were on the bus when it left the dock in yokohama. but they have been allowed to leave because they are over the age of 80 and have underlying health conditions. those are the terms the japanese government has allowed. they will be taken to a university campus north of tokyo where there quarantine will continue. they are not allowed to go home even though they have been shown to be clear of they have been shown to be clear of the virus. it's good some people are
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leaving but you'll many of those passengers onboard for the next few days at least —— but for many of those passengers onboard. so for those passengers onboard. so for those passengers onboard. so for those passengers that have left, do we have any numbers? is it the first tranche of people that will be leaving? it doesn't feel like a major change. the japanese government is basically saying most people will have to stay onboard until next wednesday, the 19th, at least in so they complete 14 days of quarantine. i think there were serious concerns raised by health experts about elderly people with underlying conditions, especially in the cramped conditions of a ship, they could suffer from — their health could deteriorate rapidly and it would be better to bring them off the ship. they have been given the choice. we suspect, although we don't know, most of those people coming off the ship are actually
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japanese passengers. most of the passengers we have spoken to say they prefer to stay onboard the ship because they are comfortable, they are used to it, they used to the food and i worried if they come off the ship they might be taken to a place where nobody speaks english. certainly the ones we have spoken to so far so they prefer to stay onboard the ship and will ride it out until the 19th. onboard the ship and will ride it out untilthe19th. rupert wingfield—hayes, thank you for bringing us up—to—date on that ship in quarantine in yokohama. donald trump's ability to wage war on iran, without approval from politicians, has been curbed in the senate. eight members of his republican party voted with democrats, despite their leader saying the resolution would make america less safe. he is expected to veto the bill once it's sent for approval to the white house. 17 jamaican men who were deported from the uk on tuesday have been released from an army processing centre in the capital, kingston. they had all been convicted of criminal offences and given prison sentences of 12 months or more.
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greg mckenzie reports. for 24—year—old chevron brown, the last 12 months have been what he describes as "a living hell" — deported from britain for a string of driving offences. he came to the uk at the age of 14 and settled in oxford before being deported back to jamaica. my accent will tell you, i'm notjamaican, i'm onlyjamaican by blood because i was born here. they are actually tearing families apart, they are ripping fathers away from their children, they are making our parents stressed. they're making the kids stressed, which will lead to further problems down the road. on tuesday, the home office resumed deportation flights back to jamaica, saying its priority was "keeping british people safe." these pictures show the 17 men being released from an army processing centre in the country's capital, kingston. i was seeing some very distraught family members, i saw a mixed reception for
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them. but importantly, i saw grown men crying. i don't take no pleasure in saying that. the fact that even one man came out from the families i was talking to, and actually had a child since, now that child has just had daddy ripped away from him entirely. and the question is — why? on that flight was 33—year—old rupert smith, a first—time offender. he left behind a wife and three children. there's a lot of emotions to put to — but i can't find a word that's suitable enough to put it altogether. it's in a sense, i'lljust say the whole feeling's empty. while the home office says it doesn't comment on individual cases, it has defended the deportations, making no apology whatsoever for seeking to remove what it says are "dangerous foreign criminals" from the uk. greg mckenzie, bbc news, kingston, jamaica. it's 7:13am. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather.
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more storms this weekend and next weekend. what's happening? yes, a bad run of weather at the moment. this weekend indeed. we will see storm dennis, maybe not quite as strong as storm shower or. rain is the feature and there is the potential for flooding. before the storm is coming. clear skies across eastern areas at the moment, some frost across scotland, eastern parts of england, which is above freezing if you are about to step out the door. clouds are starting to develop and rain spreading through this morning's rush—hour in northern ireland and western scotland. throughout the day northern england, wales things brighten up further north. temperatures 11— 12 degrees here, dropping to 6— seven in the north this afternoon. as we go into the evening rush hour we will have a
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mix of clear skies after some afternoon sunshine. the scattering of showers, some of those to be heavy on thundery and the gusto boxes indicate 50—60 mile an hour gusts are possible —— the gust boxes. a wet evening or shower across the north—west and here in east anglia we will continue to see rain through the night, pretty mild as well for the south is but northwards we will see clear skies into the start of saturday, some frost around, but there you go. rain gathering in toward the west, that is the start of what will become storm dennis as we go on to this weekend. the greatest concern is about flooding and the met office has various amber warnings in place about the pennines, dartmoor and also the south downs. i'll have further updates on that in about 30 minutes' time. rishi sunak has taken over as chancellor after sajid javid
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dramatically resigned yesterday during a cabinet reshuffle. with less than a month until the next budget, a lot will be expected from the uk's second youngest chancellor. we're joined now by robertjenrick, secretary of state for housing, communities & local government who is in westminster he is one of those who held on to hisjob in the reshuffle. can we spend a moment talking about the comments of the former chancellor as he handed in his resignation. this was in connection i've been told he needed to share his advisors between number 10 needed to share his advisors between number10 and number11 needed to share his advisors between number 10 and number 11 and he said ido number 10 and number 11 and he said i do not know of any self—respecting minister who would accept such conditions. when you saw what he said, what did you make of it?” would like to pay tribute to my friend, sajid javid, who i have known for many years and has been a great public service
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and has served his country in many important officers. he will continue to serve on the back benches. it is right that there is a co—ordinated economic function in this country, that we bring together the treasury and downing street to work as closely as possible because, at the end of the day, we were elected on a ma nifesto end of the day, we were elected on a manifesto and we want to serve the public and deliver our promises on the general election. that is exactly what we're going to do. rishi sunak is a friend of mine who i have also known for a long time. he has a job to do as we approach the budget but we are confident it would be a great budget, levelling up would be a great budget, levelling up investing in all parts of the country and taking the economy forward so that twenty20 is a good year after leaving the uk. is it true sajid javid was told to sack his advisors? i was
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not privy to those conversations but what was proposed as we bring together the back office teams that help to advise the prime minister at number 10 and those that advised the chancellor and i think that is sensible because we have a lot to do, we were elected just a few weeks ago with a big mission to level up the country, to get things done for the country, to get things done for the people, whether under the nhs or schools or low in order so we need to do that, have a strong team working as one and that is exactly what we are going to do. for many, many years, it is deemed to be exactly the opposite of what you have described. it is deemed to be healthy that there should be separate teams from the treasury, the chancellor's office and number 10. number10 and the chancellor's office and number 10. number 10 and 11 separated in some sense and that has been deemed to bea some sense and that has been deemed to be a healthy scene inasmuch as people can come to the treasury and talk to them, they can talk to
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number10. talk to them, they can talk to number 10. why something that has been established and worked well not appropriate? i do not think that is quite true. they have been times in the past where have been strong working relationships between prime ministers and chancellors. when i was first elected, when david cameron and george osborne held those officers, that was a good relationship. what really matters to the public is not who are the advisers or how government structures them but what we are intending to achieve and there is a lot we want to get done and it is an incredibly important year for the country. we left the eu injanuary and we want to make sure the budget isa and we want to make sure the budget is a strong one that really begins to deliver what we promised which is a major increase in investment in our infrastructure, investment in our infrastructure, investment in our schools, ensuring those new hospitals are built and more police officers on our streets and
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the prime minister is very much in charge and he chooses the top team and how they are structured and when government are completely focused on getting things done delivering on the priorities of the public not on special advisors or how government is run internally. people may also be interested in who the chancellor is and what kind of a person he is and what kind of a role he will have. looking briefly at the newspapers in terms of what happened yesterday. the daily mail said sajid javid fury over the pm knifing, a warning shot, the daily mirror, it calls it a bloodbath. they have depicted and others have used these phrases, the new chancellor as a puppet. phrases, the new chancellor as a puppet, a mouse piece for boris johnson —— mouthpiece and that is why he has been given the job. that
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is completely untrue. i know rishi sunak well and he is one of the most talented people in politics today. he is going to be a fantastic chancellor and he brings a great deal of experience from the private sector, he has been an excellent minister in my department and now at the treasury he has been heavily involved in the preparations for the budget in march and i think it will hit the ground running and be a fantastic chancellor but, as i say, what really matters now, as we get on and deliver everything we said we would do. the prime minister has assembled his team. some great new people coming in, including some excellent women, like the new secretary of state for international development. the team will meet later this morning and get going at pace. you have made the point several times that what people want isa several times that what people want is a government that delivers things. because our mind
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back to your area which is housing. 2015 david cameron promises to build 200,000 new homes in england for first time buyers by the end of the decade. fast forward to november 2019, a couple of months ago, the national audit office reported that none had been built and it is worth emphasising that — none had been built. it took about people who are prepared to deliver, what pledge are you prepared to make as housing minister about what you will deliver? how many of those homes will you build? that government chose not to proceed with that scheme and invest that money in other affordable homes. last year we build more homes in this country than any yet... forgive me, my question was specific, if i may...
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let me answer your question first. we have promised in our manifesto a new start to first time owners and we launch that a week or so ago and within the first 100 days of this administration we are consulting on it now as we have to do... how many will you build? i want to set first—time buyers and key workers into those homes before the end of this year. we will be giving a 30% discount to first home buyers to get on the scheme and we are expecting tens of thousands to be built and bought on the years ahead. again now we're getting some numbers. give me the timeline. you're saying tens of thousands... i have given you the timeline. we have already published our plans within weeks of being elected. we are going to be consulting, legislating and then i wa nt to consulting, legislating and then i want to see people moving into those homes as quickly as possible. this isa
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homes as quickly as possible. this is a government that is impatient to get things done and i am committed to getting more people onto the housing ladder and first homes is a key pa rt housing ladder and first homes is a key part of that because it offers 30% discount on first homes and also ensures key workers like young teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers and army veterans can get the same discounts. we are going to make sure they get going and people move into them and help renew the dream of house only. how much money is allocated? section 106 agreement which is money planned as part of the process. we expect billions of pounds will be spent on giving... how much government money? this scheme does not require government funding. how much money is going to be put... ijust
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said developer contributions pay for this so does not come at a cost to the public purse but contributions made by housebuilders in the usual way when they are building homes, some of the funding they put in will be offered asa funding they put in will be offered as a 30% discount. i am doing the opposite, i am listening very carefully a nd opposite, i am listening very carefully and twice you said the money is coming from homebuilders. how much money is coming from the government? is that it does not come ata government? is that it does not come at a cost of the taxpayer. today housebuilders make a contribution to infrastructure and housing for every large development built in this country and we are going to use some of that to ensure there is a 30% discount to local first time buyers and the housebuilders are aboard and we think it is going to be a big success and tens of thousands of people will get a 30% discount on the average home first home buyer buys which is £200,000
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today, £60,000 discount off people's first homes. the secretary of state for housing communities, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. it used to be that unusual and exotic pets were the reserve of the rich and famous, but the number of people keeping such animals in their homes is on the rise. snakes, alligators. there are concerns many people don't understand the realities of what it takes to care for them — meaning thousands are being abandoned every year. jonny mea reports. you might think it is madness to have a dangerous wild animal is entirely legal. all that is required to keep some breeds in your home is a license from the local council. in fa ct a license from the local council. in fact people have kept exotic pets for their case but the man has spiked in recent years. and estimates are that around 700,000 reptiles, including snakes, lizards, kept in households but that might be an under estimate.
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along with the boom in exotic pets, animal rescue units are reporting a rise in the some species being neglected, mistreated and even abandoned on our streets. a 6—foot snake hiding in the engine of a van in west london is still a rare side. the boom is largely filled in social media website. one of the biggest sellers are monkeys sold in britain. although you need the right paperwork to own some, surprisingly this does not apply to these monkeys. there is a lot of money in it. single once being sold, had read, selling once that are pregnant, almost encouraging people to breed them. the disturbing circumstances many of these animals are forced into after sold. this
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monkey was discovered distressed and confused. in tower hamlets. it is believed she had escaped from a flat or been abandoned by her owner. two yea rs on or been abandoned by her owner. two years on and we have tracked down to her new, more suitable home.” years on and we have tracked down to her new, more suitable home. i am finding them in every form of bizarre, crazy circumstances you can think of. in people ‘s homes, sitting rooms, outdoor sheds. think of. in people ‘s homes, sitting rooms, outdoorsheds. i think of. in people ‘s homes, sitting rooms, outdoor sheds. i have rescue one from a drugs raid in new milton. every day across the country this occurs. unless numerals come into force soon, many more will be and abandoned. what an extraordinary story. there'll be more on inside out london next monday at 7:30pm on bbc one and everywhere else on the bbc
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iplayer. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: it may be valentine's day — but it's all about puppy love for some. so, will you be buying your pooch a present today? we'll speak to the woman who'll be doing just that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. black and asian lgbt people have been telling the bbc about their experiences of racism withing the lgbt community. research by the charity stonewall shows 61% say had experienced racism while using online dating apps or in person. the charity found many from minority backgrounds said they suffered from isolation, loneliness and poor mental health, as a result.
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sometimes i would go on apps and it would say, like, no dark—skinned people, no black people, no asians. i have definitely been rejected in the past because of my race. 100% yeah. in those situations, what do you do? what can you do? you just keep it moving. as a black man you have to be hyper— masculine or you are the entertainment. the family of a woman from west london who went missing have offered 10,000 pounds. she was last seen in january 2013 in queen's park. she was going to be struggling with addiction at the time. her children say there has been a light missing from their life ever since. the number of people in the capital keeping exotic pets is on the rise. it's not illegal to keep animals like monkeys and crocodiles as long as people have the correct licence. new figures show that over the last two years the rspca has rescued around 800 in london, many of which had been abused or abandoned. let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0verground services
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between south tottenham and barking remain suspended as track repairs continue. 0n the trains: south western services are suspended between shepperton and teddington following a broken down train. 0n the roads — traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today is a fairly quiet day of weather — the calm before the storm which is set to hit us at the weekend. so today then staying dry during the daylight hours. it's a fairly bright start to the morning, but cloud will thicken as we head through the days, so quite grey by the time we get to the end of it. but lots of morning brightness. it's quite chilly. there's a touch of frost out there for a while this morning. the wind will start to strengthen as we head through the afternoon.
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top temperatures of a very mild 10—12 degrees celsius. and then it is due to turn wet through this evening and overnight. this band of rain will move down from the north—west. it is going to stall over us so still some outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and the wind is quite brisk by then too. but a mild night to come with overnight lows of nine or ten degrees celsius. now very wet and very windy over the weekend. this is storm dennis. there's a met office weather warning out for wind ofr the whole of the capital. this is an amber weather warning for rain which just creeps into parts of surrey as we head through the day on sunday so possibly some disruption, may be some localised flooding. very wet and very windy but calmer by sunday evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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it's 7:32am, friday the 14th of february. our top story — cases of mumps in england are at their highest level in a decade. public health england recorded more than 5,000 confirmed cases last year, five times the number in 2018. the increase has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges amongst young adults. boris johnson will chair the first cabinet meeting after a dramatic reshuffle saw sajid javid quit as chancellor, just four weeks before he was due to deliver his first budget. mrjavid said he'd rejected an ultimatum from the prime minister to fire his advisers. he has been replaced by the former chief secretary to the treasury, rishi sunak. the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in china has continued to rise but there are doubts over the true scale of the epidemic. as china deployed the military to combat the virus, officials said a further 121
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people died yesterday. it signalled a marked decline on wednesday's dramatic increase but the world health organization is concerned about the way cases are being counted. meanwhile some uk dentists may have to "down drills" if the shortage of face masks caused by the virus continues, according to the british dental association. all practices are now restricted to ordering 100 masks a day, leaving larger ones with several dentists running out of supplies. the body of a missing british woman has been found by police in new zealand. stephanie simpson is thought to have gone on a hike last weekend in the mount aspiring national park in the country's south island. the police have previously found items belonging to the 32—year—old from essex. so, it is 7:34am. the eagerly—anticipated bond title track, no time to die, from billie eilish has been released overnight. billie
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eilish sings you were never on my side fool me once, fool me twice are you death or paradise? no time to die is the name of the track. the 18—year—old american is the youngest person to write and record a bond theme tune and joins shirley bassey and paul mccartney in recording a song for the franchise. live and let die was a good one. which one did during and iran —— duran duran do? i liked the one by
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madonna. fallon sherrock continues to take the darts world by storm taking with it a new legion of fans. she doesn't want to be seen as a woman playing darts, she wants to be seen as a great darts player. she was a challenger in the premier league event of darts, and she managed to draw last night. she is doing great performances on the big stage. she is bringing a new legion of fa ns stage. she is bringing a new legion of fans as well. the ‘sherrock of nottingham' — a clue to where she was playing — as she was labelled last night was leading and then when she went to 6—4, meant she'd at least draw against glen durrant, which she did as he came back to level the match. as i said, no challenger has won
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a game in the premier league, which reflects the size of the achievement. and here she is afterwards, standing with defending champion michael van gerwen, then posting on social media afterwards: "what an atmosphere, what a night", as she continues to produce the performances on the biggest stage. and to arsenal's women, the defending champions beating liverpool in the women's super league last night. despite this stunning goal from rachel furness, liverpool lost 3-2. arsenal claiming the win thanks to two goals from vivianne miedema, they're third, three points off the top. and while liverpool's men close in on the title, their women in a realfight to avoid relegation. now, when do you give someone a second chance? former premier league referee bobby madley was sacked back in 2018 after sending a video mocking a disabled person. but having moved to norway, to rebuild his career, he's been given a chance to return to england to referee and will be officiating matches in league one
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and two from next season. now, can he do it? that's the question everyone's been asking of rory mcilroy in his puruit of the career grand slam by winning all four of golf‘s majors. he's returned to action in his first event since returning to world number one. he's four shots off the lead after a strong start in california. the masters, the one major that's eluded him, begins in april. how do you put the narrowest of defeats behind you as england's cricketers return to t20 action? they face soth africa later and here's bowler chrisjordan explaining just how you come back having lost last time byjust one run. that's the nature of the game. it's high risk cricket and it is a disappointment to see that. and to leave, you just have to have an honest assessment of your own performance and try and
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come back and give 10— 20% more in the next game. that is good composure. and we love a feat of endurance, we know louise is taking on a mammoth challenge for sport relief. now, how would you fancy running seven marathons, in seven days on seven different continents? a group of runners have done just that with the final race of the world marathon challenge finishing in miami yesterday. records have been set along the way? the average time taken across each of those marathons, those are some severe temperatures you have to deal with. starting in antarctica and finishing in miami. sleeping, rehyd rating, finishing in miami. sleeping, rehydrating, refuelling, getting there, running the next marathon,
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doing it all again... there, running the next marathon, doing it allagain... it there, running the next marathon, doing it all again... it is a real test of mental endurance. what did eddie do, a certain number of days? a marathon on every day for a month? always extraordinary, what they do. you feel like what is the next thing they can do? the bar is set high. what is the next challenge? he did do it, 28 marathons in a month. how can your body cope with the stress? he didn't find it easy. it is 7:40am. with some communities still clearing up the damage caused by storm ciara at the weekend, there's more bad weather on the way. that's because storm dennis is due to hit much of the uk tomorrow, with amber warnings for floods in place along the calder valley. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin
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is in todmorden. good morning to you. some places have already been very hard hit last weekend. what is the feeling there? people here are really worried. they are gathering behind us here in todmorden, keith, you are gearing up for storm dennis. i worried are you? we we re for storm dennis. i worried are you? we were hammered with storm ciara, but at the moment we know the storm is on its way, we don't know what time it is going to hit us, how bad it is going to be and what effect it will have. but the main thing is if you're ina will have. but the main thing is if you're in a flood prone area make sure you get prepared. be prepared! how bad was it last week? we have visuals. last week we ended up with the river rising four metres in four hours. more areas flooded on this occasion than we had had before. it was rather devastating for the areas that flooded and my heart goes out to the people who got
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flooded. that flooded and my heart goes out to the people who got floodedm was about 500 homes, 400 businesses, just in this area. i believe so, yes. listen, we're moving inside now to the town hall which helpfully is on high ground. step inside with me and you can see some of the community effort going on. good morning to everybody in the kitchen. hello! this is sophie and helena. you have been feeding people or we, haven't you? i have been feeding people all week. you are doing well? i know we are because this is our third time cooking. we did cooking for everyone in 2012, 2015 and now we are prepared. within ten minutes we are prepared. within ten minutes we are prepared. within ten minutes we are down here and people bring you food from the shops. you know little's are donating, maurice donates. we have coleslaw,
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cabbage, bacon... keep up the good work! come and step through into the council chamber, which is a council chamber no more. if you have been flooded, this is where you come. you come in here to register. good morning! good morning. this is where you register, you tell them what your problems are and what kind of help you need. sarah, you are from the flood group? yes, iam sarah, you are from the flood group? yes, i am the chair. did you send out an appeal? so people send me a wish list of what people need. mops, buckets... a lot of people have been donating to us. what we need is more antibacterial cleaning materials. we have mops, we have buckets, we have water clots, which is great, and yeah water clots, which is great, and yea h sto p water clots, which is great, and yeah stop i was interested in theirs. i know china has a shortage of these. but todmorden is after
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these as well. we get a lot of sewerage which comes up from sellers and these streets. —— cellar and streets and we don't want people to get any sicker than they are. so they have two wear masks as well. it's brilliant how the community has come together. yeah. and people outside the community. we have had people sending us from all over sending goods into todmorden and from all over the country. this is the killer question, we were told of these events were once in a lifetime and you have had? three in the last five years. that is the problem. is this man-made or climate made? obviously it is climate
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change, we are getting more extreme weather. we have had near misses. there is going to be set as well how people manage it at what is different about that. people is to look after their drainage and all that. it is a wide gamut of how we need to tackle it. are you getting enough support? the secretary of state for environment has since lost herjob so we would appeal definitely for that help again. we are desperate for help. we do not wa nt are desperate for help. we do not want handouts, we want sustainable change. good luck. we will be here all morning. this is a bouquet of flowers that came in from the volu nteers flowers that came in from the volunteers to say thank you very much. matt, give us your worst.
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not looking great. storm dennis will bring damaging winds and rough seas by the amount of rain is the main concern. this of the areas covered by the amber warning. across the west pennines and across parts of dartmoor. as much as 150 millimetres of rain by the time the weekend is out. by sunday, we include the south down ‘s with as much as 80 millimetres of rain. even away from these areas, a lot of rain to come. developing markedly during the next 24 hours. whether front bringing rainfall later today after a dry and bright and chilly start to friday,
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valentine's day, of course. a bit on the cool side for your morning commute but some hazy sunshine. in the west, rain spreading in, some of which will be heavy with strengthening went. in the afternoon, some rain at times for these areas. heavy and thundery showers, driest of all east anglia, the south—east of england. 0nce showers, driest of all east anglia, the south—east of england. once you see the rain into the south—west, east anglia, it will be there and there were about four much of the night. into tomorrow morning, a touch of frost around to start the weekend but any early brightness will be short—lived in through saturday, the cloud spread its way rain across many areas. in eastern parts, some dry
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moments. most persistent rain in western england and western wales and even though it will be a mild day, it is going to be an increasingly windy one. these are the wind gusts in black. those whent strengths will be maintained saturday night into sunday as the weather fronts continue to produce lots of rain through the night into sunday. a wet start to sunday across much of england and wales. find in the afternoon to southernmost counties. things brightening in the north. we will not rain began across some parts of the country but some of the wettest conditions will be in the south. the wettest and windiest gusts in the north. they could cause travel disruptions and power loss as well.
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we are talking about broadband, tv and mobile contracts. do you know when you're contract has started? do you? no, when you're contract has started? do you? no, i really do not. annoying isn't it. your contract runs out, you forget about it, and the price reverts to a higher, standard rate, rather than the cheaper deal you signed up for. well, the regulator 0fcom found that 20 million households have come to the end of their phone, broadband or pay tv contract but haven't done anything about it. from tomorrow, firms will have to warn customers ten to 40 days before their contract comes to an end. anyone who is already out of contract must also be reminded they are out of contract and told every year about
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theirfirm's best deals. some people say it is not enough. chris says it should be 60 days. most contracts require a minimum of 30 day notice before contract is terminated. in that case his contract would already be ending. but if you are at the end of it, you revert to a standard tariff. too much notice and you forget you were given notice. the point is that giving consumers the option to say, i know it is coming to an end and my price will go up and therefore need to keep a close eye on it. this is something we talked about a lot before. this is companies taking advantage of loyal customers who stay with the organisation for a long time and end up paying more to subsidise people coming
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in on a new deal. shopping around to get a better deal is important. this is a key moment when customers can take control of their services, hold the provider to account and make sure they are not overpaying and critically getting a faster, better service as well. when you start crunching the numbers they add up. mel says that we have been paying £30 too much every month for about a year because they had not told us our contract had ended. that is a lot of money. it makes a huge difference. mark mahmoud ——it
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is worth having negotiations with your current provider. if you're not happy. current provider. if you're not happy, move it somewhere else and it is the idea where the new customers get a better deal. i put it to the regulator and i said would the new deals disappear? no, that will not happen but firms will have to be more clever. we want to make sure that everyone gets a fair deal for the communications and we certainly do not want to see the death of the discount. who does not love a discount. who does not love a discount when they sign up for something new. the point of the reforms we are introducing today is to put the power back in the hands of the customer. we know that the broadband and mobile markets are incredibly competitive so by giving customers the right information at the right time, we think they will be able to shop around and get a much better deal for them. that is the view from off game. michelle says all our e—mails are wrapped together with one provider. the thought of changing that
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is too daunting. she has a point. this is putting the responsibility into the consumer's hand. great if you're willing to shop around and look around for a better deal. move your provider. that switching process has got a lot better. you should not have any downtown but things go wrong. but if you are saving 30, 40, 50 queens a—month. .. wrong. but if you are saving 30, 40, 50 queens a-month. .. it can wrong. but if you are saving 30, 40, 50 queens a-month... it can be pretty lucrative. thanks, ben. we have lots of view is that love their pets. most people do. the question is, how far do you go? some shops have started selling personalised cards for dogs and cats and you even get special biscuits and lollipops to show
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your puppy love. special diskettes and lollipops. we asked dog walkers in manchester whether they'd be spoiling their pets this valentine's. it is not something i would do but maybe some people would. absolutely not, i would give one to my wife. ido give one to my wife. i do not give anybody a valentines but if i did it would be for my dog. i wouldn't mind getting one as an adult, a human being. personally, i would not but only because my mum would. lovely dogs. do you want to set some more lovely dogs?
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archie, the therapy dog. the owner has said, no cards for these two but i know i am the number one in their lives. mick sent us this picture. my two get love 365 days a year. i like his message. 0n the isle of wight, is ringo and they are described as best friends. that looks beautiful. a stormy day at the beach, it looks lovely. a singing and dancing one. teddy does not get a card because he's spoiled every day. this is not specific to valentine's day stop the
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. there you go. we will show some more later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. black and asian lgbt people have been telling the bbc about their experiences of racism withing the lgbt community. research by the charity stonewall shows 61% say had experienced racism while using online dating apps or in person. the charity found many from minority backgrounds said they suffered from isolation, loneliness and poor mental health, as a result. sometimes i would go on apps and it would say, like, no dark—skinned people, no black people, no asians. i have definitely been rejected in the past because of my race. 100% yeah. in those situations, what do you do? what can you do? you just keep it moving. as a black man you have to be hyper— masculine or
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you are the entertainment. the number of people in the capital keeping exotic pets is on the rise. it's not illegal to keep animals like monkeys and crocodiles as long as people have the right licence. new figures show over the last two years the rspca has rescued around 800 in london, many of which had been abused or abandoned. you can see more on that story on inside out london on monday at 7.30. let's take a look at the travel situation now... the 0vergroundremians suspended between south tottenham and barking for track repairs. 0n the trains. south western services are suspended btw shepperton /teddington following a broken down train
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0n the roads — northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover 0n the m25, there's a lane closed clockwise about halfway between j24 potters bar and j25 enfield following a collision. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today is a fairly quiet day of weather — the calm before the storm which is set to hit us at the weekend. so today then staying dry during the daylight hours. it's a fairly bright start to the morning, but cloud will thicken as we head through the days, so quite grey by the time we get to the end of it. but lots of morning brightness. it's quite chilly. there's a touch of frost out there for a while this morning. the wind will start to strengthen as we head through the afternoon. top temperatures of a very mild 10—12 degrees celsius. and then it is due to turn wet through this evening and overnight. this band of rain will move down from the north—west. it is going to stall over us so still some outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and the wind is quite brisk by then too. but a mild night to come with overnight lows of nine or ten degrees celsius.
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now very wet and very windy over the weekend. this is storm dennis. there's a met office weather warning out for wind ofr the whole of the capital. this is an amber weather warning for rain which just creeps into parts of surrey as we head through the day on sunday so possibly some disruption, may be some localised flooding. very wet and very windy but calmer by sunday evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... cases of mumps in england are at the highest level in a decade, with the steep rise being largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges. boris johnson's cabinet will meet for the first time following yesterday's reshuffle, which was overshadowed by sajid javid's unexpected resignation as chancellor. china deploys the military as concern grows over the true scale of the coronavirus in hubei province. profits soar at rbs. the bank, still owned by us, as taxpayers, reports £4 billion in profit. but the amount of money it makes from uk high—street banking more than halves. so what's going on? i'll have the details. history— maker fallon sherrock caled it a night she'll never forget
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as she just misses out on victory in her premier league darts debut against the world's best. despite a bright start, wet and windy conditions on the way and this weekend storm dennis. all of the details to get you through right here on breakfast. # it's out, the new bond theme, for the new film, a time to die, is released by 18—year—old billie eilish. it's friday, 14th february. our top story... cases of mumps in england are at their highest level in a decade. public health england recorded more than 5,000 confirmed cases last year — five times the number in 2018. the increase has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges amongst young adults. we'll have more on this shortly with health professionals' advice on what
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to do if you contract the infection. borisjohnson reshuffles the cabinet and puts a new man in number 11 — rishi sunak takes over as chancellor after sajid javid dramatically resigned yesterday. mrjavid said he could not accept a demand to get rid of his advisers. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley, has more on the changes. borisjohnson's reshuffle had been billed as fairly modest, maybe even dull, moving a fewjobs around, bringing some new faces into government. reporter: hello, chancellor. but things don't always go according to plan. sajid javid had only been chancellor for seven months and he had been expected to stay. but behind closed doors, the prime minister asked him to sack all his aides and share his advisers with number 10. the chancellorsaid, no, resigned, then headed home to explain why. the conditions that were attached was a requirement that i replace all my political advisers. you know, these are people who'd worked incredibly hard, on behalf of notjust the government, but the whole
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country, done a fantasticjob. i was unable to accept these conditions. i don't believe any self—respecting minister would accept such conditions. and, so, therefore, ifelt the best thing to do was to go. reporter: good afternoon, chancellor. rishi sunak gets hisjob and is due to deliver the budget in less than a month. borisjohnson's top team will look a bit different when it meets later this morning. the pm has even more power now. the question is, what will he do with it? nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. so, who is rishi sunak and why is he so in favour with boris johnson? iain watson is on downing street this morning. he can tell us more. paint us a picture of the new chancellor. for a start, pretty young. forsomebody picture of the new chancellor. for a start, pretty young. for somebody in that post. george osborne was too. he is 39. a meteoric rise for which she soon. former investment banker, should know what he is doing
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when it comes to balancing the books —— for rishi sunak. sajid javid departed only yesterday and a budget next month, he was number two at the treasury, already working on some of the detail of the budget, so there will be a bit of a running start for rishi sunak. two other reasons why i think he will be in post, festival borisjohnson does rate him highly asa borisjohnson does rate him highly as a media performer, he liked his performances in the general election campaign —— first of all. seen as a safe pair of hands and very loyal. the second reason is borisjohnson has several constraints, he said in his manifesto he would not necessarily put up taxes and he also wa nts to necessarily put up taxes and he also wants to see the books balanced by the middle of the parliament, but he also has a demand from new voters who backed the conservatives for the very first time and he needs to show them he is willing to spend money on their priorities. certainly from his
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point of view having a newer fresher chancellor and a team of advisers that actually work towards the same name and break down the old institutional barriers that used to exist between number 10 and number 11, it will give the prime minister a freer hand and also enhance his authority at the very time when he believes he has to deliver for people who have given him their votes. for the moment, thank you. the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in china has continued to rise but there are doubts about the true scale of the epidemic. in the last few hours, officials said a further 121 people died yesterday. it signalled a marked decline on wednesday's dramatic increase, but the world health organization is concerned about the way cases are being counted. let's get more now from our china correspondent, stephen mcdonell, who's in beijing. tell us about the concerns now about what is being counted and who
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by?m is all a bit complicated in terms of the numbers and what constitutes someone who is definitely infected. but i can tell you, let's assume for the moment, before i break it down, the moment, before i break it down, the figures are real in terms of the trend. there is a very different picture within hubei province and the rest of china. within hubei province, another 5000 extra infected cases. 0utside province, another 5000 extra infected cases. outside of hubei, not that many increases at all. in shanghai, not one increase. that was yesterday. that gives you an idea of why people are thinking the strict restrictions on people's movements throughout the country seem to be kicking in and slowing the spread of the disease. within hubei, the reason we have another big jump potentially as people are being moved from probably infected into
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the definitely infected category and thatis the definitely infected category and that is because they have now decided, if you have coronavirus symptoms, if you have a ct scan showing a chest infection, they will not wait for the results to come back from the lab for a major test, you will be put in the definitely infected category. it is why we saw much more dramatic jump infected category. it is why we saw much more dramaticjump yesterday, 10,000. today another 5000. just in hubei province. it may well be it does not keep going up that much as those people were moved from the probably into the definitely infected camp. what it also seems to show is that from the central government people have gone down to hubei, taken control of the situation from the local government which has been highly criticised over the way it has handled things, especially in the early days. those more senior people have come from shanghai and beijing and spoken to the doctors who had told them, look, these people are infected, why
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are you waiting for laboratory tests? they are listening to the doctors. that is what they have changed the way people arejudged that is what they have changed the way people are judged in terms of which category they are in. the only problem is in terms of trying to work out the trajectory, makes it more complicated because now we are measuring apples and oranges and it isa measuring apples and oranges and it is a bit hard to see where things are going. if we take all those people, for example, out of the officially infected category again, using the old form of categorising them, it does not seem like there is such a huge jump. them, it does not seem like there is such a hugejump. even within hubei province, they are having some luck in terms of slowing the spread of the disease, although it is very serious in hubei and especially wuhan city. thank you very much, from beijing. the latest from the cruise ship, diamond princess, docked in yokohama. we can speak to rupert wingfield—hayes who can bring you the latest. we understand some people have been able
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to leave.” think some good news today from the diamond princess. when we spoke yesterday, i was telling you there we re yesterday, i was telling you there were 44 new confirmed cases on thursday. the good news today, no new confirmed cases of the virus on board the ship today. that is the first time for a number of days when we have seen that. since the weekend, i think. we have seen that. since the weekend, ithink. that we have seen that. since the weekend, i think. that is good news. the other part of good news is the japanese government is allowing some people to leave the ship. the most elderly and the most frail people on the ship, over 80, elderly and the most frail people on the ship, over80, people elderly and the most frail people on the ship, over 80, people with underlying health conditions, they have been given the choice to stay or leave. we are not sure how many but we have seen a bus—load leave the ship this afternoon and go to another facility north of tokyo where they will be taken care of but less cramped conditions and they can be looked after better by medical staff on shore. for the rest of the 3700 people, still on board, many
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say they want to stay on board, they prefer to, they will stay on at least we think until next wednesday, the 19th is the day we have been told they will make a decision whether to release them or not. the japanese, says it will have to screen everybody, all 3700 people, they will have to be checked for the virus before they are given the all clear to leave the ship. thank you for update. a number of passengers have left, don't know exactly how many, bosses have been seen leaving, the very latest from on—board cruise ship. we will keep you updated from the story. breaking news. rbs results. we watch this very closely because we still own 62% of it as taxpayers. it was bailed out in the financial crisis and still hugely in government hands. profits soaring. just over £3 billion in profit last
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year. but if you start to look at the detail, we get a better picture of what is happening. profit in the street uk commercial bit that we all know, the branches we go into, more than halved profit, real concerns about the future of high street banking, still £850 million. a slightly nerdy but important thing in this. they are changing the name of the parent company. now it is rbs group and it also has natwest, all pa rt group and it also has natwest, all part of the group. they have decided that rather than being called rbs, they will call themselves natwest. which is which? rbs group owns rbs and natwest and they have decided natwest is a better name. it is interesting because you might think it is semantics and a name change but it is because perhaps the rbs logo and name is a bit toxic
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because at the height of the financial crisis, it took £45.5 billion of government money in 2008. alison rose, new boss, first woman to run a big six bank, she denies it is toxic, on the high street, you will still get rbs branches, but nonetheless, the parent company is changing its name. when banks are not making profits, people worry. but also when they make a lot of money, people go, why are they making so much money? the money they are making this because it is a global bank, fingers and so many pies and it has a lot of investment banking, commercial banking, business loans. the bit that we will probably come into contact with every day is walking into a natwest or rbs branch, that bit not making as much money. the rest of it doing pretty well off the back of this. thank you. some other stories for you now... the body of a missing british
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woman has been found by police in new zealand. stephanie simpson is thought to have gone on a hike last weekend in the mount aspiring national park in the country's south island. the police have previously found items belonging to the 32—year—old from essex. you might remember that last week we were talking about record—breaking temperatures in antarctica. 18.3 degrees. and even then people we re 18.3 degrees. and even then people were saying it was extraordinary, very alarming. ridiculous. again. latest record temperature is 20 celsius. in context on the 8 degrees warmer than the warmest place in the uk today. i remember speaking to you when we were talking about the temperatures before and now we have yet another record temperature. indeed. in antarctica, it is summer at the moment, but incredible temperature. the average temperature through the year across antarctica are believed to be around three degrees above the preindustrial average, probably the more alarming
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fa ct, average, probably the more alarming fact, we could see more records tumble in the years ahead. let's get back to what is happening here and now. 12 degrees here today. all eyes on what is happening this weekend as storm dennis comes our way, rough seas, damaging and disrupting wins, but of greatest concern probably the rain full on saturated ground. the met office has issued a number of amber weather warnings for the week ahead. some across parts of northern england, wales and south—west especially. this morning it is calm before a chilly start, temperatures a few degrees above freezing, eastern areas dry and bright sunshine, cloud increasing in the west and wet end went into the rush hourin west and wet end went into the rush hour in scotland and northern ireland. the rain spreading into northern england, wales and the south—west this afternoon. temperatures around 12 degrees. little bit fresher further north. as we finish the day, sunshine and showers. some showers across scotla nd showers. some showers across scotland will be heavy with hail
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and thunder. pretty dusty winds. black arrows show the maximum winds, 50, 60 mph. gales over northern england by the state. the afternoon rain should have cleared. wet evening rush—hour force should have cleared. wet evening rush—hourforce in should have cleared. wet evening rush—hour force in wales and the midlands. rain coming and going in the south keeping it pretty mild for the south keeping it pretty mild for the time of year. further north, clear skies allowing temperatures to drop down with a touch of frost. rain arrives more widely and strong winds on saturday and an indication of the greatest areas of concern, met office amber warnings, west pennines, brecon beacons, dartmoor and later this weekend across the south downs. more on that in half an hour. useful having the mapsjust for anyone concerned. just to pinpoint the greatest concern areas, absolutely. thank
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you. back to our main story this morning. cases of mumps in england are at their highest level in a decade. public health england says the increase has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges amongst young adults who missed out on the mmr vaccine when they were children. tim muffett reports. i would literally be screaming from being in pain... lectures, essays, the odd party and mumps — flora, ben and 0llie's second year at leeds university hasn't gone quite to plan. i went to bed normal, like, normal, doing fine, everything fine, and then i woke up and then, bang, my face was just puffed out, so swollen. were you surprised as to how painful it was? i got prescribed morphine, it was that bad. it just started out with just pain in my ear and jaw, and then it kind of started swelling, so painful. like, yourjaw pretty much locks and i could open my mouth this much.
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brushing my teeth, felt a lump round here, and it started swelling up. yeah, i had a pretty fat face. other students who've had mumps have been sharing before and after photos. the number of cases in england is at its highest level in a decade and many universities and colleges have seen outbreaks. there were more than 5,000 laboratory—confirmed cases of mumps last year — almost five times the number seen in 2018. last month alone, there were nearly three times as many cases as the previous january. today's young adults were born in the late ‘90s and early 20005. now, that was when the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was incorrectly linked to autism, creating a panic amongst parents. now, the link has been proved to be false, but many children missed out on their mmr jab. the cohort of young people who weren't vaccinated are now at university, getting to know each other, sharing their bugs, and that's meant we've seen this huge
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increase in cases. around half of mumps cases last year were amongst unvaccinated people, according to public health england, but many, like flora, ben and ollie, did have the mmrjab, and the follow—up booster, and yet they still got mumps. the challenge is that the mumps element of the vaccine isn't quite as effective as it is for measles and rubella. the more people that are vaccinated, the harder it is for the bug to get around and be shared in the first place. so, even if you had two mmrjabs, you could still potentially get mumps, partly because a lot of people did not and therefore the virus is more prevalent? precisely. mumps typically passes with no lasting damage. those who've had an mmr jab are less likely to suffer serious complications. on rare occasions, it can lead to hearing loss, viral meningitis, and infertility in men. anyone unsure if they've had an mmrjab or a booster is advised to see a doctor. with vaccinations, it's never too late to catch up.
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tim muffett, bbc news. the dangers perfectly illustrated there. joining us now here in the studio is gp dr amir khan and, from our studios in london, public health doctor dr vanessa saliba. very good morning to you. dr vanessa saliba, first of all, the scale of the changes, this is a dramatic rise ina the changes, this is a dramatic rise in a short space of time. yes, your piece described it very nicely. 5000 cases last year and the increase is continuing this year, we would expect it to continue, and as you say, driven by young people, we have the most cases in 15—25 —year—olds who missed out on the mmr jab when they were younger and they are passing it on in close contact settings like universities and couege settings like universities and college so we are seeing large outbreaks feeling transmission. how can you explain those who say they have been vaccinated but
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are still getting the mumps? it is important to talk about that. we offer mmr vaccine to every child when they turn one and second dose before they start school. the mmr vaccine is really good at protecting young children from mumps and we don't see very many children from mumps and we don't see very many cases children from mumps and we don't see very many cases in children at all in fact. but the immunity wanes with time and by the time you are a teenager, young adult entering university, college, you may get months even if you are vaccinated. however, the important message is the vaccine will still protect you from the severe end of the spectrum. from the complications of months. protected from ending up in hospital with months and from getting the complications. it is still really important protecting your health and it will... high levels of vaccine u pta ke it will... high levels of vaccine uptake in college and university will limit the spread and the size of the outbreaks. it is important to remember the dangers of months. suzanne has said,
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got in touch... my husband is death because of months andi husband is death because of months and i don't think people are aware of the potential risks of not being immunised —— deaf. the stark contrast in the report and the pain, people perhaps thinking it is something quite relaxed, comes and goes. it is not a minor illness. when you have it, you are very unwell. you have joint pain, feel very fatigued, get huge glands, but as was said by the public health doctor, the long—term complications, meningitis, deafness, infertility in men, serious complications. you are a practising gp, what are you seeing in terms of who is coming in? we have seen a rise in cases of mumps in leeds where we are based on that is very worrying, part of it is because we are close to a university and people in close proximity and the age. but at the same time, on a wee kly the age. but at the same time, on a
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weekly basis, i am still having to convince parents about the beneficial effects of vaccines. there is so much misinformation, it isa there is so much misinformation, it is a constant battle to get the right information. we were just hearing the effectiveness of the vaccine does wane in time. if you are an adult... that is the mumps pa rt of are an adult... that is the mumps part of the mmr. measles and rubella, the immunity will last a lifetime, hopefully. there is an argument for a booster mmr as we get older may be and that might be something we look to in the future but if you are not sure whether you are vaccinated, you should go and see your gp. you cannot be over vaccinated. if there is no record, you're not sure, you could have a booster through your gp. a couple of things, if there are people and clearly there are turning up at gp surgeries asking question, should i, iam not surgeries asking question, should i, i am not sure, it is as if the message still is not getting through? actually, we know the u pta ke of through? actually, we know the uptake of mmr children in vaccine
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nowadays is very high, we have 95% u pta ke of nowadays is very high, we have 95% uptake of one dose of mmr by the age of five, we want to do better with two doses by that age, we continue to work with the nhs and parents to make sure they get children vaccinated on time. why would they not go for the second? is that you forget? an active decision not to do it? in the main, it is about reminding parents. we do well you annual surveys of parents asking about their concerns, trust in vaccines and the mmr in particular has never been higher. parents will ta ke has never been higher. parents will take up the vaccine if it is offered in the right way and at the right time. as children get older, we all know, having families, lots of kids, it can be busy, lots of priorities on your plate, but it is really important to get the mmr vaccine and to get it in time to protect your
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children at the right time. we touched on this with the gp in the studio, dr saliba, the idea that as awareness is increasing and cases are being seen, what about adults concerned and they hear that the mumps part of the mmr vaccine does wane in effectiveness, what should people think about, what should the message be if they are concerned and think they are at risk, adults? the main thing to do is check you are up—to—date because some people may think they have had two doses but then when they check the record it is not clear. you can call your gp to get up—to—date as soon as possible. if you have mumps, the message is you need to stay home, don't pass on the infection to others. everyone should be aware of hand hygiene, washing hands, catch it, bin it, kill it. you can spread it, bin it, kill it. you can spread it by touching, sneezing, kissing. wash your hands and you stay home if you are unwell. if you're not sure if he had two doses of the vaccine, call yourgp,
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if he had two doses of the vaccine, call your gp, three on the nhs, no upperage limit, call your gp, three on the nhs, no upper age limit, everyone can get the two doses. your technicality, how do you check? we will have a record in the gp surgery of all our patients and vaccination history so you can ring up and you can either arrange a phone consultation with yourgp or arrange a phone consultation with your gp or practice nurse... they will have your records dating back with previous doctors as well. will have your records dating back with previous doctors as weltm you are not up to date, you can a lwa ys you are not up to date, you can always get up—to—date even as an adult, you can get the immunisations. thank you very much. dr saliba and dramir immunisations. thank you very much. dr saliba and dr amir khan, thank you. more severe weather on the way this weekend. jayne is in todmorden in the calder valley this morning. it is an area experiencing bad weather —— that has experienced bad weather —— that has experienced bad weather and the impact. absolutely. people here were told severe weather
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events like this were once in a hundred year events. they have had fourin hundred year events. they have had four in the last eight years. this morning in todmorden they are gearing up for market day and storm dennis. five years ago, millions of pounds of damage was caused and millions spent on flood defences but still this place was submerged once again when storm ciara hit last weekend. some of the flood defences are not even in place yet five years after the first huge event. now with the clear up operation under way, still this week they are gearing up for the next and weather warning. we are with the team of volunteers getting ready to tackle the worst of it. first, the news, weather and travel where you are waking up this morning. hello, your day may have started dry and cool and bright but for many of you it won't stay that way. we have
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a weather front, here we are on saturday. we will all be affected by some heavy rain, some very strong winds and even as far ahead as sunday, that same weather front doesn't clear away. so that is a real concern. the rain for some of you just keeps on coming and coming. possibly some strong winds as well. that is why the met office have done the sums and issued an amber warning on saturday and sunday for various parts of the british isles. all the details on the website. here is today's wet and windy weather, coming through scotland and northern ireland in the course of the morning into northern and western parts of england and wales in the afternoon. what for many will be a milder day than was the case on thursday. the weather front through the evening and overnight never gets away from the far south—east and that is part of the problem because the rain, having started keeps on going into saturday and into sunday. elsewhere, i think we stay frost free for the most part. could be a couple of dry hours for you if you get up early on saturday but he will have to
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because here comes storm dennis. the low centre up towards iceland, this front sweeps towards a british isles and the rain keeps coming across many of those western hills and the wind will be not as strong as last weekend, but still equally disruptive for some. the ferries and bridges and power lines may be affected by this as well, on what will be a ludicrously mild day across the southern part for the time of year. 14 or 15. on sunday, the weather front still not clearing away so the rainfall totals keep rising. could see a couple of months worth of rain over the course of their weekend in some areas in a very windy end to the weekend across parts of scotland.
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this is worklife from bbc news,
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with ben bland and david eades. uneasy riders. willa legal crackdown see the wheels come off the multi—billion dollar e—scooter business? live from london, that's our top story on friday 14 february. they've been hailed by some as the green urban transport of the future, but others see them as a dangerous menace. e—scooters may be controversial, but they are also a growing business worth billions of dollars. also in the programme... the impact of coronavirus on singapore's economy. the government says a recession could be possible, and... who is the uk's new finance minister, rishi sunak? we'll be finding out.

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